Laughter Club Song Music Video

Benefits Of Laughter

Enhances the immune system

Relieves stress

Reduces blood pressure

Reduces pain

Increases endorphins, the body's natural painkillers

Improves lung capacity and oxygen levels

Provides a massage for internal organs

Is contagious, like yawning

May help prevent heart disease

Sources:

American Journal of Medical Sciences, Alternative Therapies, Psychology Today,The Scientist of the University of Maryland Medical Center (as cited in The Orange County Register)

See Laughter Yoga live in action:

laughers

American Cowboy

Click to view

Name:  American Cowboy

Level of Vigor*:  3 – 8

How to Lead:

  1. 1. Declare: “The next exercise is called ‘American Cowboy.”
  2. 2. Demonstrate: “You’re a rootin’-tootin’, six-gun shootin’,  laughing cowboy from the wild west.  You can raise your hat, shoot your pistols, spur your horse or rope a cow.”
  3. 3. Do:  “Are you ready?  Get on your horse and… -> GIDDYUP!”

Benefits: Can be performed as vigorously as desired, riding/running around the space (for aerobic benefits); or the laffer can just gently tip their hat “Howdy, Ma’m”.

Variations:  Half of the group can be Cowboys, the other half Laughing Ladies (or Saloon Girls, or Indians, or Cows, or Wild Horses being roped).  Laugh for 20-40 seconds, then switch roles.  Find American Cowboy in Dr. Kataria’s Foundation Exercises. Click here to download. Also found in The Great Big Anthology of Laughter Exercises.

Origin: One of Kataria’s Forty Foundation Exercises under the title “American Laughter,” but many Americans didn’t know what it meant.  Clarified in 2008 for production of the Laughter Exercise Photo Flash Cards (click to download) and renamed “American Cowboy Laughter.”

Notes: The Leader can encourage playful interaction by participating creatively and with enthusiasm.

See on the web:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7f27Vih1Ww

* All sessions begin with the advice that participants may engage at whatever level they wish.  The “Level of Vigor” offered is a suggestion of the intensity range at which the exercise is typically performed.